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Fidget Spinners

Posted by Erwin Scholman on

What is a Fidget Spinner?

Fidget spinners are one of the more bizarre inventions that the internet has helped create, primarily because besides helping people who have fidgeting issues, they have no purpose.

They are marketed as products that can help you deal with other habits that you are trying to kick, like nail biting and smoking. Aside from that, they are also mentally beneficial, with some saying that they have helped to sooth the impacts of anxiety.

What are the origins of the Fidget Spinner

Without the internet, it’s true that we may never have seen the fidget spinner. The power of the web has brought likeminded people together and allowed us to take on understated yet ever-present problems such as fidgeting. It was in 2016 that a Kickstarter project snowballed, surpassing its $15,000 target, accruing an astonishing $6 million. The project in question was a fidget cube toy, with fidgety favorites such as rollers, buttons and switches, all incorporated in one compact device. The project went viral on social media and the rest is history.

What do fidget spinners do and why should I buy one?

You can glean from the name that fidget spinners have been designed to help tackle fidgeting. From children with ADHD to adults numbed with boredom in the office, all demographics have been struck with the fidgeting urge at some point in time – but until now, there has never been a specially designed toy to help overcome the issue. Hence people have been left with dirty habits such as biting their nails, or driving other people up the wall by clicking their pen or tapping their fingers.

The finger spinner comes with none of these issues – indeed, it isn’t even a distractor for those in the workplace, with many anecdotal reports suggesting that the hypnotic whizz of the spinner while in motion actually helps to increase concentration levels. Furthermore, the fidget spinner requires only one hand, leaving your other one free to complete any tasks you may have.

Can fidget spinners actually relieve symptoms of ADHD and autism?

The evidence, however, just isn’t there. There haven’t been any thorough studies to evaluate the toys’ effect on those conditions. And experts warn that for some kids with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, the spinners might be a harmful distraction.

“Things that are routine or have some demand, it’s much harder for children with ADHD to be able to pay attention. And so, [the spinner] may well make things worse for them,” said Dr. Mark Wolraich, a behavioral pediatrician at Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center.

Read more

Fidget Spinners

Posted by Erwin Scholman on

What is a Fidget Spinner?

Fidget spinners are one of the more bizarre inventions that the internet has helped create, primarily because besides helping people who have fidgeting issues, they have no purpose.

They are marketed as products that can help you deal with other habits that you are trying to kick, like nail biting and smoking. Aside from that, they are also mentally beneficial, with some saying that they have helped to sooth the impacts of anxiety.

What are the origins of the Fidget Spinner

Without the internet, it’s true that we may never have seen the fidget spinner. The power of the web has brought likeminded people together and allowed us to take on understated yet ever-present problems such as fidgeting. It was in 2016 that a Kickstarter project snowballed, surpassing its $15,000 target, accruing an astonishing $6 million. The project in question was a fidget cube toy, with fidgety favorites such as rollers, buttons and switches, all incorporated in one compact device. The project went viral on social media and the rest is history.

What do fidget spinners do and why should I buy one?

You can glean from the name that fidget spinners have been designed to help tackle fidgeting. From children with ADHD to adults numbed with boredom in the office, all demographics have been struck with the fidgeting urge at some point in time – but until now, there has never been a specially designed toy to help overcome the issue. Hence people have been left with dirty habits such as biting their nails, or driving other people up the wall by clicking their pen or tapping their fingers.

The finger spinner comes with none of these issues – indeed, it isn’t even a distractor for those in the workplace, with many anecdotal reports suggesting that the hypnotic whizz of the spinner while in motion actually helps to increase concentration levels. Furthermore, the fidget spinner requires only one hand, leaving your other one free to complete any tasks you may have.

Can fidget spinners actually relieve symptoms of ADHD and autism?

The evidence, however, just isn’t there. There haven’t been any thorough studies to evaluate the toys’ effect on those conditions. And experts warn that for some kids with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, the spinners might be a harmful distraction.

“Things that are routine or have some demand, it’s much harder for children with ADHD to be able to pay attention. And so, [the spinner] may well make things worse for them,” said Dr. Mark Wolraich, a behavioral pediatrician at Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center.

Read more


The latest info about Cape Towns water crisis

Posted by Erwin Scholman on

The facts and figures about the water crisis in Cape Town

The water crisis in Cape town is becoming more and more dangerous. Time for a few facts and figures about the crisis and some solutitions to solve this big problem.

The dams

There are six major dams in Cape Town; Berg River, Steenbras Lower, Steenbras Upper, Theewaterskloof, Voëvlei, and Wemmershoek. These holds 99.6% of the city’s water capacity, with eight smaller dams, mostly on Table Mountain, responsible for a mere 0.4%. Theewaterskloof is the largest of the six major dams, with a total capacity of 480,188 megalitres. It is responsible for storing more than half of Cape Town’s surface water supply.

As of Monday 15 May, the level of Theewaterskloof was just 15.7%, compared to close to 31.3% at the same time last year, 51.3% in 2015, and 74.5% in 2014. Across the six dams the levels were a mere 21.2%, a record low.

Theewaterskloof on 15-5-17

The Berg River Dam is the third largest dam supplying the city, behind Theewaterskloof and Voëlvlei. The dam was at 33% of capacity last week, higher than the 27% this time last year, but much lower than the 54% level in 2015, and 90.5% in 2014.

Though the dam wall currently stores more than 42,000 megalitres of water, parts of the reservoir are dry. In areas of the dam higher up, people are able to walk across the reservoir from one bank to another. There is no sign of plant or animal life at the dam and the earth was cracked in places due to arid conditions.

What’s causing the water crisis?

Population growing faster than storage

Since 1995 the city’s population has grown 55%, from about 2.4 million to an expected 4.3 million in 2018. Over the same period dam storage has increased by only 15%.

The Berg River Dam, which began storing water in 2007, has been Cape Town’s only significant addition to water storage infrastructure since 1995. It’s 130,000 megalitre capacity is over 14% of the 898,000 megalitres that can be held in Cape Town’s large dams. Had it not been for good water consumption management by the City, the current crisis could have hit much earlier.

solutions

There is not one single solution available to solve the problem. The biggest thing is that it is not possible to create water on a big scale. The only sollution is a lot of rainfall but thats someting out of our control. Everyone is part of the solurtion now. everyone has to watch the use of water and make sure that nobody waste his water and make sure you use as less as possible

 

Read more

The latest info about Cape Towns water crisis

Posted by Erwin Scholman on

The facts and figures about the water crisis in Cape Town

The water crisis in Cape town is becoming more and more dangerous. Time for a few facts and figures about the crisis and some solutitions to solve this big problem.

The dams

There are six major dams in Cape Town; Berg River, Steenbras Lower, Steenbras Upper, Theewaterskloof, Voëvlei, and Wemmershoek. These holds 99.6% of the city’s water capacity, with eight smaller dams, mostly on Table Mountain, responsible for a mere 0.4%. Theewaterskloof is the largest of the six major dams, with a total capacity of 480,188 megalitres. It is responsible for storing more than half of Cape Town’s surface water supply.

As of Monday 15 May, the level of Theewaterskloof was just 15.7%, compared to close to 31.3% at the same time last year, 51.3% in 2015, and 74.5% in 2014. Across the six dams the levels were a mere 21.2%, a record low.

Theewaterskloof on 15-5-17

The Berg River Dam is the third largest dam supplying the city, behind Theewaterskloof and Voëlvlei. The dam was at 33% of capacity last week, higher than the 27% this time last year, but much lower than the 54% level in 2015, and 90.5% in 2014.

Though the dam wall currently stores more than 42,000 megalitres of water, parts of the reservoir are dry. In areas of the dam higher up, people are able to walk across the reservoir from one bank to another. There is no sign of plant or animal life at the dam and the earth was cracked in places due to arid conditions.

What’s causing the water crisis?

Population growing faster than storage

Since 1995 the city’s population has grown 55%, from about 2.4 million to an expected 4.3 million in 2018. Over the same period dam storage has increased by only 15%.

The Berg River Dam, which began storing water in 2007, has been Cape Town’s only significant addition to water storage infrastructure since 1995. It’s 130,000 megalitre capacity is over 14% of the 898,000 megalitres that can be held in Cape Town’s large dams. Had it not been for good water consumption management by the City, the current crisis could have hit much earlier.

solutions

There is not one single solution available to solve the problem. The biggest thing is that it is not possible to create water on a big scale. The only sollution is a lot of rainfall but thats someting out of our control. Everyone is part of the solurtion now. everyone has to watch the use of water and make sure that nobody waste his water and make sure you use as less as possible

 

Read more


Things every South-African local should own:

Posted by Allek Pottas on

1. AHD 4 channel CCTV kit with internet and 4G phone viewing

With all those acronyms you’ll certainly feel like a spy during the Cold War, but those spies wished they had this kind of technology. With night vision, internet backup, six different operational modes, and 3G phone viewing, you’ll be far more prepared than Bond.

2. Digitway 10 000 MAH Powerbank

For South-African people are friends and family the most important thing in the whole wide world. To keep in contact with them whole the day a mobile charger is an absolute must have!

3. Two in one kaleidoscope swivel out compact make up kit

Another important thing in South-Africans life is their look and image. With this make up kit you can look more beautiful than Beyoncé or Rihanna and impress everyone around you!

4. Universal spring roll maker

Food. Nobody can live without it. With this spring roll maker you can make every food very special and good looking. Create your own sushi creations and be like chef Gordon Ramsey.

5. DIY outdoor mist cooling system

Whenever summer comes, it’s always a good thing. Fun filled days, pool parties, beach bods and bronze tans. But it also brings the heat, and in some cases record high temperatures. But with the DIY Outdoor Mist Cooling System, your braai or outdoor event will be the coolest place in town.

Read more

Things every South-African local should own:

Posted by Allek Pottas on

1. AHD 4 channel CCTV kit with internet and 4G phone viewing

With all those acronyms you’ll certainly feel like a spy during the Cold War, but those spies wished they had this kind of technology. With night vision, internet backup, six different operational modes, and 3G phone viewing, you’ll be far more prepared than Bond.

2. Digitway 10 000 MAH Powerbank

For South-African people are friends and family the most important thing in the whole wide world. To keep in contact with them whole the day a mobile charger is an absolute must have!

3. Two in one kaleidoscope swivel out compact make up kit

Another important thing in South-Africans life is their look and image. With this make up kit you can look more beautiful than Beyoncé or Rihanna and impress everyone around you!

4. Universal spring roll maker

Food. Nobody can live without it. With this spring roll maker you can make every food very special and good looking. Create your own sushi creations and be like chef Gordon Ramsey.

5. DIY outdoor mist cooling system

Whenever summer comes, it’s always a good thing. Fun filled days, pool parties, beach bods and bronze tans. But it also brings the heat, and in some cases record high temperatures. But with the DIY Outdoor Mist Cooling System, your braai or outdoor event will be the coolest place in town.

Read more


Another legend past away, Ahmed Mohamed "Kathy" Kathrada

Posted by Erwin Scholman on

Kathrada underwent surgery relating to a blood clot on the brain earlier this month but experienced several postoperative complications and contracted pneumonia, which affected both his lungs.

Ahmed Mohamed "Kathy" Kathrada was born on 21 August 1929, to Indian immigrant parents in Schweizer Reneke, a small town in Western Transvaal [now North West Province].  While he attended Johannesburg Indian High School. Kathrada’s political work began in 1941, at the early age of 12 when he joined the Young Communist League of South Africa, distributing leaflets at street corners for the League.

In the 1940s, Kathrada first met African National Congress (ANC) leaders, Walter Sisulu, Nelson Mandela, I.C. Meer and J.N. Singh.  At the age of 17, he left school to work full-time in the offices of the Transvaal Passive Resistance Council. In 1946, the South African Indian Congress (SAIC) launched the Passive Resistance Movement against the Asiatic Land Tenure and Indian Representation Act, commonly referred to as the "Ghetto Act".

Kathrada was one of the 2 000 volunteers imprisoned in that campaign and served a month in a Durban jail along with other ardent resisters such as Dr Monty Naicker, Dr. Yusuf Dadoo, Dr Goonam, George Singh, Mrs Cissie Gool, M.D. Naidoo and others. This was his first jail sentence for civil disobedience.

In 1954, he was served with banning orders prohibiting him from attending any gatherings and from taking part in the activities of 39 organisations. These bans curtailed his overall participation in politics, but it did not deter him. He was arrested several times for breaking his 'banning orders'.

In 1956, he was among the 156 Congress activists and leaders charged for High Treason. The trial continued for four years from 1957 to March 1961. Eventually, all 156 leaders were found not guilty and acquitted. Kathrada, Mandela and Sisulu were among the last 30 to be acquitted. Despite constant harassment by the police, Kathrada nevertheless continued his political activities.

In December 1962, he was subjected to 'house arrest' for 13 hours a day and over weekends and public holidays. He went underground and continued to attend secret meetings in Rivonia - the underground headquarters of the ANC. The following year, Kathrada broke his banning orders, and went “underground”, to continue his political work.

In July 1963, the police swooped on Liliesleaf Farm in Rivonia, a Johannesburg suburb where Kathrada and other “banned” persons had been meeting. This led to the famous 'Rivonia Trial', in which eight accused were sentenced to life imprisonment with hard labour

This was Kathrada’s 18th arrest on political grounds. Although he was then no longer a member of the Umkhonto we sizwe (MK) Regional Command, he was tried with Nelson Mandela, Walter Sisulu, Govan Mbeki, Dennis Goldberg, Raymond Mhlaba, Elias Motsoaledi and Andrew Mlangeni.  All the accused were charged with organising and directing MK, the military wing of the ANC, and were found guilty of committing specific acts of sabotage. In 1964, at the age of 34, he was sentenced to life imprisonment on Robben Island where he spent the next 18 years with his colleagues in the isolation section, known as B Section, of the Maximum Security Prison. His prisoner number was 468/64. This was a section where those considered by the Apartheid government as influential leaders or members of banned political organisations were kept. While he was still serving his sentence, the ANC bestowed on him, with its highest possible accolade, the Isitwalandwe Award.

In October 1982, Kathrada was moved to Pollsmoor Maximum Security Prison in Cape Town to join Mandela, Sisulu, Mhlaba and Mlangeni who had been moved there a few months before. He was released on 15 October 1989, at the age of 60. On his release, Kathrada had spent 26 years and 3 months in prison, 18 of which were on Robben Island.

On his release, he was given a hero’s welcome in Soweto where he addressed a crowd of 5 000 people. Kathrada remarked, "I never dreamed I would be accorded such status." Walter Sisulu wrote of him: "Kathy was a tower of strength and a source of inspiration to many prisoners, both young and old."

While in prison, Kathrada pursued his academic studies and first obtained a B.A. (History and Criminology). He went on to attain a B. Bibliography (Library Science and African Politics) and two B.A. (Honours) degrees from the University of South Africa (UNISA) in African politics and History. In addition, he was awarded four Honorary Degrees, including one from the University of Missouri.

Following the unbanning of the ANC in February 1990, at its first legal conference in Durban, South Africa, Kathrada was elected onto its National Executive Committee. He also served on the ANC Interim Leadership Committee and Interim Leadership Group of the South African Communist Party (SACP). He gave up the latter position when he was elected to the ANC National Executive Committee at its conference in July 1991. That same year Kathrada became Acting Head of the ANC's Department of Information and Publicity and Head of Public Relations until 1994. Also that year he was appointed a fellow of the University of Western Cape’s Mayibuye Centre. In 1992, he went on Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca). He was elected a Member of Parliament in 1994, after South Africa's first democratic elections, and in 1994-5 he was elected Chairperson of the Robben Island Museum Council. He served in that capacity until his term expired in 2006. He also served as a Parliamentary Counsellor in the Office of the President. At the ANC Conference in 1997, Kathrada declined nomination to the National Executive Committee. Then in June 1999, Kathrada took leave of parliamentary politics.

Rest in peace hero!

Source: http://www.sahistory.org.za/people/ahmed-kathrada

                http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/breaking-ahmed-kathrada-has-died-20170328

https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2017-03-28-ahmed-kathrada-1929-2017-an-honourable-and-humble-hero/#.WNpOysCLTIU

Read more

Another legend past away, Ahmed Mohamed "Kathy" Kathrada

Posted by Erwin Scholman on

Kathrada underwent surgery relating to a blood clot on the brain earlier this month but experienced several postoperative complications and contracted pneumonia, which affected both his lungs.

Ahmed Mohamed "Kathy" Kathrada was born on 21 August 1929, to Indian immigrant parents in Schweizer Reneke, a small town in Western Transvaal [now North West Province].  While he attended Johannesburg Indian High School. Kathrada’s political work began in 1941, at the early age of 12 when he joined the Young Communist League of South Africa, distributing leaflets at street corners for the League.

In the 1940s, Kathrada first met African National Congress (ANC) leaders, Walter Sisulu, Nelson Mandela, I.C. Meer and J.N. Singh.  At the age of 17, he left school to work full-time in the offices of the Transvaal Passive Resistance Council. In 1946, the South African Indian Congress (SAIC) launched the Passive Resistance Movement against the Asiatic Land Tenure and Indian Representation Act, commonly referred to as the "Ghetto Act".

Kathrada was one of the 2 000 volunteers imprisoned in that campaign and served a month in a Durban jail along with other ardent resisters such as Dr Monty Naicker, Dr. Yusuf Dadoo, Dr Goonam, George Singh, Mrs Cissie Gool, M.D. Naidoo and others. This was his first jail sentence for civil disobedience.

In 1954, he was served with banning orders prohibiting him from attending any gatherings and from taking part in the activities of 39 organisations. These bans curtailed his overall participation in politics, but it did not deter him. He was arrested several times for breaking his 'banning orders'.

In 1956, he was among the 156 Congress activists and leaders charged for High Treason. The trial continued for four years from 1957 to March 1961. Eventually, all 156 leaders were found not guilty and acquitted. Kathrada, Mandela and Sisulu were among the last 30 to be acquitted. Despite constant harassment by the police, Kathrada nevertheless continued his political activities.

In December 1962, he was subjected to 'house arrest' for 13 hours a day and over weekends and public holidays. He went underground and continued to attend secret meetings in Rivonia - the underground headquarters of the ANC. The following year, Kathrada broke his banning orders, and went “underground”, to continue his political work.

In July 1963, the police swooped on Liliesleaf Farm in Rivonia, a Johannesburg suburb where Kathrada and other “banned” persons had been meeting. This led to the famous 'Rivonia Trial', in which eight accused were sentenced to life imprisonment with hard labour

This was Kathrada’s 18th arrest on political grounds. Although he was then no longer a member of the Umkhonto we sizwe (MK) Regional Command, he was tried with Nelson Mandela, Walter Sisulu, Govan Mbeki, Dennis Goldberg, Raymond Mhlaba, Elias Motsoaledi and Andrew Mlangeni.  All the accused were charged with organising and directing MK, the military wing of the ANC, and were found guilty of committing specific acts of sabotage. In 1964, at the age of 34, he was sentenced to life imprisonment on Robben Island where he spent the next 18 years with his colleagues in the isolation section, known as B Section, of the Maximum Security Prison. His prisoner number was 468/64. This was a section where those considered by the Apartheid government as influential leaders or members of banned political organisations were kept. While he was still serving his sentence, the ANC bestowed on him, with its highest possible accolade, the Isitwalandwe Award.

In October 1982, Kathrada was moved to Pollsmoor Maximum Security Prison in Cape Town to join Mandela, Sisulu, Mhlaba and Mlangeni who had been moved there a few months before. He was released on 15 October 1989, at the age of 60. On his release, Kathrada had spent 26 years and 3 months in prison, 18 of which were on Robben Island.

On his release, he was given a hero’s welcome in Soweto where he addressed a crowd of 5 000 people. Kathrada remarked, "I never dreamed I would be accorded such status." Walter Sisulu wrote of him: "Kathy was a tower of strength and a source of inspiration to many prisoners, both young and old."

While in prison, Kathrada pursued his academic studies and first obtained a B.A. (History and Criminology). He went on to attain a B. Bibliography (Library Science and African Politics) and two B.A. (Honours) degrees from the University of South Africa (UNISA) in African politics and History. In addition, he was awarded four Honorary Degrees, including one from the University of Missouri.

Following the unbanning of the ANC in February 1990, at its first legal conference in Durban, South Africa, Kathrada was elected onto its National Executive Committee. He also served on the ANC Interim Leadership Committee and Interim Leadership Group of the South African Communist Party (SACP). He gave up the latter position when he was elected to the ANC National Executive Committee at its conference in July 1991. That same year Kathrada became Acting Head of the ANC's Department of Information and Publicity and Head of Public Relations until 1994. Also that year he was appointed a fellow of the University of Western Cape’s Mayibuye Centre. In 1992, he went on Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca). He was elected a Member of Parliament in 1994, after South Africa's first democratic elections, and in 1994-5 he was elected Chairperson of the Robben Island Museum Council. He served in that capacity until his term expired in 2006. He also served as a Parliamentary Counsellor in the Office of the President. At the ANC Conference in 1997, Kathrada declined nomination to the National Executive Committee. Then in June 1999, Kathrada took leave of parliamentary politics.

Rest in peace hero!

Source: http://www.sahistory.org.za/people/ahmed-kathrada

                http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/breaking-ahmed-kathrada-has-died-20170328

https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2017-03-28-ahmed-kathrada-1929-2017-an-honourable-and-humble-hero/#.WNpOysCLTIU

Read more


Human rights day 2017

Posted by Erwin Scholman on

Tuesday, 21 March is National Human Rights Day. National Human Rights Day in South Africa refers to the day set aside to celebrate Human Rights and to remind all South Africans of their Human Rights.

Human Rights Day, What does it mean?

Human Rights are the rights that everyone has, simply because they are human. We all have these rights from the moment we are born. We do not have to earn them and they cannot easily be taken away from us.

Chapter 2 of the Constitution contains the Bill of Rights, which refers to the list of Human Rights. Everyone in South Africa, including the Government, must adhere to these Rights. It is very difficult to change the constitution, which in turn makes it difficult to change the Bill of Rights.

Why 21 March?

Human Rights Day was implemented on 21 March due to the Sharpville Massacre of 1960. On this day, many events were planned to protest against Pass Laws (dompass). This law required all Africans to carry their pass with them, failure to do so would result in arrest by the Police. On this day, people decided to go to the Police stations without their passes and demand to be arrested. The idea was that the prisons become so full, that the country would not be able to function properly and in doing so the passbooks would be scrapped.

Thousands of people gathered at the Sharpeville Police Station, but was met by 300 Police Officers. After a scuffle broke out, Police opened fire on the group and 67 people were killed, and 180 injured. These people were simply striving for equal rights.

A basic list of Human Rights as in the Bill of Rights:

  • Equality (Section 9)
  • Human dignity (Section 10)
  • Freedom of expression (Section 16)
  • Assembly, demonstration, picket and petition (Section 17)
  • Freedom of association (Section 18) and
  • Freedom of movement and residence (Section 21)

 

What does Human Rights mean to you as a South African and how are you going to enjoy National Human Rights Day?

Read more

Human rights day 2017

Posted by Erwin Scholman on

Tuesday, 21 March is National Human Rights Day. National Human Rights Day in South Africa refers to the day set aside to celebrate Human Rights and to remind all South Africans of their Human Rights.

Human Rights Day, What does it mean?

Human Rights are the rights that everyone has, simply because they are human. We all have these rights from the moment we are born. We do not have to earn them and they cannot easily be taken away from us.

Chapter 2 of the Constitution contains the Bill of Rights, which refers to the list of Human Rights. Everyone in South Africa, including the Government, must adhere to these Rights. It is very difficult to change the constitution, which in turn makes it difficult to change the Bill of Rights.

Why 21 March?

Human Rights Day was implemented on 21 March due to the Sharpville Massacre of 1960. On this day, many events were planned to protest against Pass Laws (dompass). This law required all Africans to carry their pass with them, failure to do so would result in arrest by the Police. On this day, people decided to go to the Police stations without their passes and demand to be arrested. The idea was that the prisons become so full, that the country would not be able to function properly and in doing so the passbooks would be scrapped.

Thousands of people gathered at the Sharpeville Police Station, but was met by 300 Police Officers. After a scuffle broke out, Police opened fire on the group and 67 people were killed, and 180 injured. These people were simply striving for equal rights.

A basic list of Human Rights as in the Bill of Rights:

  • Equality (Section 9)
  • Human dignity (Section 10)
  • Freedom of expression (Section 16)
  • Assembly, demonstration, picket and petition (Section 17)
  • Freedom of association (Section 18) and
  • Freedom of movement and residence (Section 21)

 

What does Human Rights mean to you as a South African and how are you going to enjoy National Human Rights Day?

Read more